About

HISTORY

NSBR started at Free Minds, Free People in Houston in June, 2009, a national conference on liberatory education. During a youth strategy meeting, participants decided to develop a national bill of rights as an organizing tool. Representatives from Oakland, Providence, Baltimore, Chicago and Salt Lake City continued to meet by phone throughout the following year and some cities worked on local bills. In June, 2010 the youth organized a People’s Movement Assembly at the US Social Forum to share with each other and with other youth what they had accomplished on the local level.: In 2011 in Providence, Rhode Island youth held a national gathering at the Free Minds Free People conference. Hosting over 250 youth from over 2 dozen cities, the rights were further engaged and expanded and the idea for a National Youth Vote Campaign was developed.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How long has NSBR been around?
Youth have been working on the draft since 2009.

Is the NSBR a legislative bill?
No. But we think it should be. And we understand that a much larger effort will be needed involving tens of thousands, even millions of young people and their communities. We are organizing across the country and in our communities to make the NSBR a reality. Right now, it begins with 100, 000 youth votes.

What rights do students have?
Not many. That’s why we are organizing around the NSBR. Youth, under the age of 18 have child protection laws which include things like freedom from abuse and harm and a prohibition of child labor to prevent exploitation for example. However, while there are a lot of laws in place at the state and federal levels designed to protect minors from abuse and exploitation, these laws don’t prevent educational injustices from occurring nor do they create educationally just communities.

What does NSBR stand for?
The National Student Bill of Rights for all youth

What is the age limit?
Youth ages 13 to 24 can vote and organize. If you are older you can join the Adult Allies support committee.

Do I have to be a student in school to be apart of the NSBR organizing process or vote? No. Just within the age limit.

How do I stay connected to the process?
National NSBR Taskforce co-chairs:

  • Niqua Douglas, niqua@projectsouth.org, 404.622.0602
  • Jamal Jones, jamal.jones76@yahoo.com, 410.446.7942

Voicemail hotline: 404.804.1689
Facebook Group: fb.com/groups/96854348156
Twitter: @NSBRmovement

How do I get involved? Contact us. Right now we’re trying to gather 100, 000 NSBR ballots across the country and will need youth to gather ballots and organize locally to bring more youth into the process.

What are we doing after the vote?
ACTION! Youth groups and organizations will determine rights that they want to take action on and organize around. We will also analyze the vote and develop a report on the results. The Task Force hopes to organize a national gathering to reflect on the vote process and determine next steps.

What does the vote determine and decide?
This voting process will help us define a national youth vision for education justice. It will also help us identify what needs to happen within our communities and schools to create education justice and build a social justice youth movement in the US.

What are we going to do to make the NSBR a reality?
Organize, Organize, and Organize.